On Tuesday, May 28, maintenance work will be carried out on our website. During this time the following actions cannot be performed: Purchases/orders, redeeming access tokens, new user registrations, updates to user details. If you have any questions or comments, please contact our support team at [email protected]
Skip to main content
Published Online:https://doi.org/10.1026/0943-8149.16.3.150

Abstract. At a broad level, the Konstanz Health Psychology research group aims at understanding the judgment and decision making processes underlying health-relevant behaviors. Towards this goal, several more specific research agendas are addressed. A primary aim is to understand the transition from knowing about risks to personally feeling at risk. In particular, we study the reception of relevant personalised health feedback such as feedback on cholesterol levels or blood pressure. Contrary to the dominant models of biased reasoning, our results on feedback reception suggest that people respond adaptively to health risk feedback. Furthermore, we study changes in the perception of health risk across time and their associated effects on the onset, maintenance, and cessation of health-relevant behaviors. In current research, we try to utilize methods from affective neuroscience for assessing affective and intuitive processes relevant to personal feelings of risk. These efforts are motivated by the broader goal of developing theoretical frameworks that can be applied across a range of behavioral domains.

References

  • Armitage, C. J. , Conner, M. (2000). Social cognition models and health behaviour: A structured review. Psychology and Health, 15, 173–189. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Baumeister, R. F. , Bratslavsky, E. , Finkenauer, C. , Vohs, K. D. (2001). Bad is stronger than good. Review of General Psychology, 5, 323–370. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Brewer, N. T. , Weinstein, N. D. , Cuite, C. L. , Herrington, J. E., Jr. (2004). Risk perceptions and their relation to risk behavior. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 27, 125–130. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Croyle, R. T. , Sun, Y. C. , Hart, M. (1997). Processing risk factor information: Defensive biases in health-related judgments and memory. In K. L. Petrie, J. A. Weinman, (Eds.), Perceptions of health and illness (pp. 267–290). Amsterdam: Harwood. First citation in articleGoogle Scholar

  • Ditto, P. H. , Scepansky, J. A. , Munro, G. D. , Apanovitch, A. M. , Lockhart, L. K. (1998). Motivated sensitivity to preference-inconsistent information. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 75, 53–69. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Finucane, M. L. , Holup, J. L. (2006). Risk as a value: Combining Affect and analysis in risk judgements. Journal of Risk Research, 9, 141–164. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Hooker, K. , Kaus, C. R. (1994). Health-related possible selves in young and middle adulthood. Psychology and Aging, 9, 126–133. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Lazarus, R. S. , Folkman, S. (1984). Stress, appraisal, and coping. New York: Springer. First citation in articleGoogle Scholar

  • Lerman, C. , Croyle, R. T. , Tercyak, K. P. , Hamann, H. (2002). Genetic testing: Psychological aspects and implications. Health Psychology, 70, 784–797. First citation in articleGoogle Scholar

  • Leventhal, H. , Brissette, I. , Leventhal, E. A. (2003). The common-sense model of self-regulation of health and illness. In L. D. Cameron, H. Leventhal, (Eds.), The self-regulation of health and illness behavior (pp. 42–65). Howard: Routledge. First citation in articleGoogle Scholar

  • Loewenstein, G. F. , Weber, E. U. , Hsee, C. K. , Welch, N. (2001). Risk as feelings. Psychological Bulletin, 127, 267–286. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Panzer, M. , Renner, B. (in press). To be or not to be at risk: Spontaneous reactions toward risk feedback. Psychology & Health. First citation in articleGoogle Scholar

  • Penny, G. N. , Bennett, P. , Herbert, M. (1994). Health psychology: A lifespan perspective. Chur, Switzerland: Harwood Academic Publishers. First citation in articleGoogle Scholar

  • Peterson, C. , Bossio, L. M. (2001). Optimism and physical well-being. In E. C. Chang, (Ed.), Optimism & pessimism: Implications for theory, research, and practice (pp. 127–145). Washington: American Psychological Association. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Renner, B. (2003). Hindsight bias after receiving self-relevant health risk information: A motivational perspective. Memory, 11, 455–472. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Renner, B. (2004). Biased reasoning: Adaptive responses to health risk feedback. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 30, 384–396. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Renner, B. , Knoll, N. , Schwarzer, R. (2000). Age and body weight make a difference in optimistic health beliefs and nutrition behaviors. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 7, 143–159. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Renner, B. , Kwon, S. , Yang, B.-H. , Paik, K.-C. , Kim, S. H. , Roh, S. , Song, J. , Schwarzer, R. (2008). Social-cognitive predictors of eating a healthy diet in South Korean men and women. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 15, 4–13. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Renner, B. , Panzer, M. , Oeberst, A. (2007). Risikokommunikation. In B. Six, U. Gleich, W. Gimmler, (Hrsg.), Lehrbuch Kommunikationspsychologie (S. 251–270). Weinheim: Beltz. First citation in articleGoogle Scholar

  • Renner, B. , Schmälzle, R. , Schupp, H. (in press). Risikowahrnehmung und Risikokommunikation. In J. Bengel, M. Jerusalem, , Handbuch für Gesundheitspsychologie und Medizinische Psychologie. Göttingen: Hogrefe. First citation in articleGoogle Scholar

  • Renner, B. , Schupp, H. (2005). Risikowahrnehmung und Gesundheitsverhalten. In R. Schwarzer, (Hrsg.), Gesundheitspsychologie. Enzyklopädie der Psychologie (S. 173–193). Göttingen: Hogrefe. First citation in articleGoogle Scholar

  • Renner, B. , Schüz, B. , Sniehotta, F. (2008). Preventive health behaviour and adaptive accuracy of risk perceptions. Risk Analysis, 28, 1–8. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Renner, B. , Schwarzer, R. (2003). Social-cognitive factors predicting health behavior change. In J. Suls, K. Wallston, (Eds.), Social psychological foundations of health and illness (pp. 169–196). Oxford: Blackwell. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Renner, B. , Spivak, Y. , Kwon, S. , Schwarzer, R. (2007). Age and health behaviour change: Differences in predicting physical activity of South Korean adults. Psychology & Aging, 22, 482–493. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Renner, B. , Staudinger, U. M. (in press). Gesundheitsverhalten alter Menschen. In A. Kuhlmey, D. Schaeffer, . Handbuch Alter, Gesundheit und Krankheit. Bern: Huber. First citation in articleGoogle Scholar

  • Scheier, M. F. , Carver, C. S. , Bridges, M. W. (2001). Optimism, pessimism, and psychological well-being. In E. C. Chang, (Ed.), Optimism and pessimism: Implications for theory, research, and practice (pp. 189–216). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Schmälzle, R. , Renner, B. , Schupp, H. (2008). Intuitive Judgments of HIV Risk: An Event-Related Potential Study. Poster presented at DGPA Spring School ”Biopsychology of Emotions”, Seeon, Germany, March 27–30 2008. First citation in articleGoogle Scholar

  • Schwarzer, R. , Renner, B. (2000). Social-cognitive predictors of health behavior: Action self-efficacy and coping self-efficacy. Health Psychology, 19, 487–495. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Spiro, A. (1999). Health in midlife: Toward a life-span view. In S. L. Wills, J. D. Reid, (Eds.), Life in the middle: Psychological and social development in middle age. San Diego, CA: Academic Press. First citation in articleGoogle Scholar

  • Staudinger, U. M. , Freund, A. , Linden, M. , Maas, I. (1999). Self, personality, and life management: Psychological resilience and vulnerability. In P. B. Baltes, K. U. Mayer, (Eds.), The Berlin Aging Study: Aging from 70 to 100 (pp. 302–326). New York: Cambridge University Press. First citation in articleGoogle Scholar

  • Taylor, S. E. (1991). Asymmetrical effects of positive and negative events: The mobilization minimization hypothesis. Psychological Bulletin, 110, 67–85. First citation in articleGoogle Scholar

  • Vollmann, M. , Renner, B. , Weber, H. (2007). Optimism and social support: The providers’ perceptive. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 2, 205–215. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Weber, H. , Vollmann, M. , Renner, B. (2007). The spirited, the observant, and the disheartened: Social concepts of optimism, realism, and pessimism. Journal of Personality, 75, 169–197. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Weinstein, N. D. (2003). Exploring the links between risk perceptions and preventive health behavior. In J. Suls, K. A. Wallston, (Eds.), Social psychological foundations of health and illness (pp. 22–53). Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Weinstein, N. D. , Rothman, A. J. , Nicolich, M. (1998). Use of correlational data to examine the effects of risk perceptions on precautionary behavior. Psychology & Health, 13, 479–501. First citation in articleCrossrefGoogle Scholar