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Published Online:https://doi.org/10.1037/a0030888

Personal growth initiative refers to the conscious pursuit of individual growth across multiple life domains. The construct was recently reconceptualized as a multidimensional trait and has attracted attention from researchers outside the United States. The present study sought to extend this literature by examining personal growth initiative in relation to international student adjustment and as a possible buffer of acculturative stress. We collected data from 386 international students studying in the United States. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) indicated adequate fit for the four-factor model, yielding similar results to studies involving primarily European American college students. Regression analyses indicated that the Planfulness dimension of personal growth initiative accounted for significant variance in adjustment, even with relevant demographic and cultural factors included. In addition, we found indications of a moderation effect, whereby higher levels of the Using Resources dimension of personal growth initiative seemed to buffer the effect of acculturative stress on adjustment.

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